Easy-On-You DIY Easter Egg Hunt

Have you ever been to an Easter Egg Hunt that was a free-for-all? Where little kids are stampeded by big kids and someone ended up in tears because they didn’t get a single egg? It’s happened to us and it’s no fun at all.

That’s why, when we started having a neighborhood egg hunt, I was determined to take away the tears and replace them with fun. And not kill myself in the process.

Here’s how we’ve operated our annual Easter Egg Hunt for the past four or so years…

RELATED: Grand Rapids Easter Egg Hunts and Easter Bunny Outings 2017

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Choose a Time & Date

Sounds trivial, but planning your date well in advance gives you ample time to prepare and be organized. If you’re catering to little ones who still nap, plan your Egg Hunt for the morning. We typically get started around 9:30 or 10:00 AM.

Also, your Egg Hunt doesn’t have to happen before Easter or on Easter weekend. People appreciate another activity the weekend after Easter if that works best for you.

Easter Egg Hunt

Structure Your Egg Hunt

In my opinion, setting up the structure is the most important part of a well-run Egg Hunt.

Here’s a look at how we set up our event:

  1. Send out invitations. Be clear about your expectations on the invite. I require that all kids have adults present at the Egg Hunt to participate.
  2. Parents RSVP to the Egg Hunt by dropping 12 PRE-STUFFED plastic eggs per child by the night before. Let parents know what you’d like inside of the eggs or you may get unwrapped candies or other unwanted objects. (They sign a clipboard that I leave in my garage so I do not have sit there all day collecting eggs.)
  3. Parents tell us how old their kids are when they RSVP.
  4. Parents can choose to donate extra eggs if desired for children who cannot provide their own. I always provide a few extra myself (plus the super special golden egg, containing CASH!) because every year kids show up who were not able to contribute. This way, there are enough eggs for everyone and no one is singled out or embarrassed.
  5. Divide the participants into age groups and “hide” eggs in different locations around your yard. We have three groups at our Egg Hunt: ages 0-3, 4-6, and 7+.
  6. The night before the hunt we count up all of the donated eggs and divide them into the different age groups. Easter Egg Hunt
  7. The morning of the hunt, adult helpers come over and help hide the eggs. No kids are allowed at our house during this time. Our own children help us hide the little kid eggs on the lawn, but then they are confined to the middle of the house so there’s no peeking.
  8. Once people arrive, I give instructions. Kids are told to find 10 eggs and then to help other kids who don’t have 10 yet. Adults are NOT to find the eggs. If everyone gets 10, then we’ll announce they are allowed to find 2 more. Big kids need to be told to pick up whatever eggs they find and not just eat the candy and drop the eggs as they go. Easter Egg Hunt
  9. We stagger the start times of each age group. The youngest group picks up eggs from the lawn first. The second group goes next and hunts along the edge of our woods. The oldest kids are told to wear rain boots and they go into the woods by our creek to find the “golden egg” – with money inside – as well as the candy-filled eggs. It usually takes the older kids 30 or more minutes to find the eggs in our woods, and the golden egg is always hidden really hard and is fun to try to find.DSC_7993 (1)

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SEE ALSO: The GIGANTIC Grand Rapids Spring Fun Guide for Kids

Take Pictures and Have Fun at Your Egg Hunt

That’s it! Take pictures and enjoy yourself while the kids have a blast. A little organization goes a long ways toward everyone having a good time.

Let me know if you have any tips/ideas for throwing a good neighborhood egg hunt by leaving a comment below!

Easter Egg Hunt